Trait core::iter::FromIterator1.0.0 [] [src]

pub trait FromIterator<A>: Sized {
    fn from_iter<T: IntoIterator<Item=A>>(iter: T) -> Self;
}

Conversion from an Iterator.

By implementing FromIterator for a type, you define how it will be created from an iterator. This is common for types which describe a collection of some kind.

FromIterator's from_iter() is rarely called explicitly, and is instead used through Iterator's collect() method. See collect()'s documentation for more examples.

See also: IntoIterator.

Examples

Basic usage:

fn main() { use std::iter::FromIterator; let five_fives = std::iter::repeat(5).take(5); let v = Vec::from_iter(five_fives); assert_eq!(v, vec![5, 5, 5, 5, 5]); }
use std::iter::FromIterator;

let five_fives = std::iter::repeat(5).take(5);

let v = Vec::from_iter(five_fives);

assert_eq!(v, vec![5, 5, 5, 5, 5]);

Using collect() to implicitly use FromIterator:

fn main() { let five_fives = std::iter::repeat(5).take(5); let v: Vec<i32> = five_fives.collect(); assert_eq!(v, vec![5, 5, 5, 5, 5]); }
let five_fives = std::iter::repeat(5).take(5);

let v: Vec<i32> = five_fives.collect();

assert_eq!(v, vec![5, 5, 5, 5, 5]);

Implementing FromIterator for your type:

fn main() { use std::iter::FromIterator; // A sample collection, that's just a wrapper over Vec<T> #[derive(Debug)] struct MyCollection(Vec<i32>); // Let's give it some methods so we can create one and add things // to it. impl MyCollection { fn new() -> MyCollection { MyCollection(Vec::new()) } fn add(&mut self, elem: i32) { self.0.push(elem); } } // and we'll implement FromIterator impl FromIterator<i32> for MyCollection { fn from_iter<I: IntoIterator<Item=i32>>(iter: I) -> Self { let mut c = MyCollection::new(); for i in iter { c.add(i); } c } } // Now we can make a new iterator... let iter = (0..5).into_iter(); // ... and make a MyCollection out of it let c = MyCollection::from_iter(iter); assert_eq!(c.0, vec![0, 1, 2, 3, 4]); // collect works too! let iter = (0..5).into_iter(); let c: MyCollection = iter.collect(); assert_eq!(c.0, vec![0, 1, 2, 3, 4]); }
use std::iter::FromIterator;

// A sample collection, that's just a wrapper over Vec<T>
#[derive(Debug)]
struct MyCollection(Vec<i32>);

// Let's give it some methods so we can create one and add things
// to it.
impl MyCollection {
    fn new() -> MyCollection {
        MyCollection(Vec::new())
    }

    fn add(&mut self, elem: i32) {
        self.0.push(elem);
    }
}

// and we'll implement FromIterator
impl FromIterator<i32> for MyCollection {
    fn from_iter<I: IntoIterator<Item=i32>>(iter: I) -> Self {
        let mut c = MyCollection::new();

        for i in iter {
            c.add(i);
        }

        c
    }
}

// Now we can make a new iterator...
let iter = (0..5).into_iter();

// ... and make a MyCollection out of it
let c = MyCollection::from_iter(iter);

assert_eq!(c.0, vec![0, 1, 2, 3, 4]);

// collect works too!

let iter = (0..5).into_iter();
let c: MyCollection = iter.collect();

assert_eq!(c.0, vec![0, 1, 2, 3, 4]);

Required Methods

fn from_iter<T: IntoIterator<Item=A>>(iter: T) -> Self

Creates a value from an iterator.

See the module-level documentation for more.

Examples

Basic usage:

fn main() { use std::iter::FromIterator; let five_fives = std::iter::repeat(5).take(5); let v = Vec::from_iter(five_fives); assert_eq!(v, vec![5, 5, 5, 5, 5]); }
use std::iter::FromIterator;

let five_fives = std::iter::repeat(5).take(5);

let v = Vec::from_iter(five_fives);

assert_eq!(v, vec![5, 5, 5, 5, 5]);

Implementors