1. 1. Introduction
  2. 2. Getting Started
  3. 3. Tutorial: Guessing Game
  4. 4. Syntax and Semantics
    1. 4.1. Variable Bindings
    2. 4.2. Functions
    3. 4.3. Primitive Types
    4. 4.4. Comments
    5. 4.5. if
    6. 4.6. Loops
    7. 4.7. Vectors
    8. 4.8. Ownership
    9. 4.9. References and Borrowing
    10. 4.10. Lifetimes
    11. 4.11. Mutability
    12. 4.12. Structs
    13. 4.13. Enums
    14. 4.14. Match
    15. 4.15. Patterns
    16. 4.16. Method Syntax
    17. 4.17. Strings
    18. 4.18. Generics
    19. 4.19. Traits
    20. 4.20. Drop
    21. 4.21. if let
    22. 4.22. Trait Objects
    23. 4.23. Closures
    24. 4.24. Universal Function Call Syntax
    25. 4.25. Crates and Modules
    26. 4.26. `const` and `static`
    27. 4.27. Attributes
    28. 4.28. `type` aliases
    29. 4.29. Casting between types
    30. 4.30. Associated Types
    31. 4.31. Unsized Types
    32. 4.32. Operators and Overloading
    33. 4.33. Deref coercions
    34. 4.34. Macros
    35. 4.35. Raw Pointers
    36. 4.36. `unsafe`
  5. 5. Effective Rust
    1. 5.1. The Stack and the Heap
    2. 5.2. Testing
    3. 5.3. Conditional Compilation
    4. 5.4. Documentation
    5. 5.5. Iterators
    6. 5.6. Concurrency
    7. 5.7. Error Handling
    8. 5.8. Choosing your Guarantees
    9. 5.9. FFI
    10. 5.10. Borrow and AsRef
    11. 5.11. Release Channels
    12. 5.12. Using Rust without the standard library
  6. 6. Nightly Rust
    1. 6.1. Compiler Plugins
    2. 6.2. Inline Assembly
    3. 6.3. No stdlib
    4. 6.4. Intrinsics
    5. 6.5. Lang items
    6. 6.6. Advanced linking
    7. 6.7. Benchmark Tests
    8. 6.8. Box Syntax and Patterns
    9. 6.9. Slice Patterns
    10. 6.10. Associated Constants
    11. 6.11. Custom Allocators
  7. 7. Glossary
  8. 8. Syntax Index
  9. 9. Bibliography

Drop

Now that we’ve discussed traits, let’s talk about a particular trait provided by the Rust standard library, Drop. The Drop trait provides a way to run some code when a value goes out of scope. For example:

struct HasDrop;

impl Drop for HasDrop {
    fn drop(&mut self) {
        println!("Dropping!");
    }
}

fn main() {
    let x = HasDrop;

    // do stuff

} // x goes out of scope hereRun

When x goes out of scope at the end of main(), the code for Drop will run. Drop has one method, which is also called drop(). It takes a mutable reference to self.

That’s it! The mechanics of Drop are very simple, but there are some subtleties. For example, values are dropped in the opposite order they are declared. Here’s another example:

struct Firework {
    strength: i32,
}

impl Drop for Firework {
    fn drop(&mut self) {
        println!("BOOM times {}!!!", self.strength);
    }
}

fn main() {
    let firecracker = Firework { strength: 1 };
    let tnt = Firework { strength: 100 };
}Run

This will output:

BOOM times 100!!!
BOOM times 1!!!

The tnt goes off before the firecracker does, because it was declared afterwards. Last in, first out.

So what is Drop good for? Generally, Drop is used to clean up any resources associated with a struct. For example, the Arc<T> type is a reference-counted type. When Drop is called, it will decrement the reference count, and if the total number of references is zero, will clean up the underlying value.